USA: Sort kvindelig jøde mister sit arbejde for at være imod anti-semitisme

I USA kan man ikke være imod anti-semitisme uden samtidig at være imod islamofobi.

April Powers Condemned Jew-Hate. Then She Lost Her Job.

The inclusion officer’s identity as a black Jew should have made her unassailable. Instead, it was used to discredit her

The Society for Children’s Book Writers and Editors is an organization for established and aspiring professionals in children’s and young adult literature. The publishing industry is famously left-wing, but the world of children’s publishing makes the rest of the industry look like milquetoast moderates. In the past few years, Young Adult authors have rewritten already published work deemed offensive. They have seen the ratings of a not-yet-released book torpedoed by organized takedown campaigns on Goodreads. They have cancelled their own titles after (often flimsy) allegations of racism, or been compelled to reveal private, even traumatic details of their lives in order to “prove” that they have the standing to tell certain kinds of stories. In one particularly notorious case, Kirkus Reviews retracted its starred review of the novel “American Heart” and issued a new one scolding its “problematic” elements after a Twitter outrage. 

It was in that context that the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Editors put up a post on Facebook that began: “The SCBWI unequivocally recognizes that the world’s 14.7 million Jewish people (less than 0.018% of the population) have the right to life, safety, and freedom from scapegoating and fear.” The June 10 post went on to condemn antisemitism as “one of the oldest forms of hatred,” and asked readers to “join us in not looking away.”

April Powers, the woman who wrote the post, is black and Jewish. And, as of last week, she is out of a job.

Læs her hvorfor.

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